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Press Archives

04.07.2022

Microplastic pollution in the Northeast Atlantic: First long-term record from deep water layers of the open ocean

Scientists from the IOW for the first time analysed a long-term sample series on microplastic pollution in the Northeast Atlantic from 2000 m water depth with respect to number, size, mass, material and possible origin of the particles. Samples were collected between 2003 – 2015 in the Madeira Basin by a sediment trap. Plastic type and particle amount varied widely, but accounted for up to 8% of total particle flux. The most common plastic materials were polyethylene and PVC.

03.06.2022

“Research at the highest level” – The Björn Carlson Baltic Sea Prize has been awarded to IOW researcher Maren Voß

The Björn Carlson Baltic Sea Prize of the Björn Carlson Baltic Sea Foundation was awarded to Maren Voß from the IOW in Stockholm today. The prize is endowed with 3 million Swedish kronor. The foundation honoured the scientist’s groundbreaking research on marine nitrogen cycles in the Baltic Sea.

30.05.2022

Comprehensive scientific assessment for the Baltic Sea region at international Baltic Earth Conference

From May 30 to June 3, the 4th Baltic Earth Conference will take place in Jastarnia on Hel peninsula, Poland. The focus is on a comprehensive scientific assessment of the Baltic Sea region, especially with regard to the effects of climate change. The conference is jointly organized by the International Baltic Earth Secretariat at Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, the Leibniz Institute of Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde (IOW), and the Institute of Oceanology at Polish Academy of Sciences, Sopot.

10.05.2022

How close is the tipping point? New studies on the Atlantic current system

With a new publication in the scientific journal Nature Climate Change, climate researchers from Kiel and Warnemünde once again contribute to the understanding of changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) – also known as the “Gulf Stream System”. It is important both for the global climate as well as for climate events in Europe. The authors focus on the question, whether human-induced climate change is already slowing down this global oceanic circulation. According to the study, natural variations are still dominant.

20.04.2022

IOW researcher Maren Voß will be the first Björn Carlson Baltic Sea Prize laureate

The Björn Carlson Baltic Sea Prize of the Swedish Björn Carlson Baltic Sea Foundation, which will be awarded for the first time this year, goes to Prof. Maren Voß from the IOW. She is being honoured for her groundbreaking research on the importance of nitrogen in marine cycles and particularly its role in the overfertilisation of the Baltic Sea. The prize, endowed with 3 million Swedish kronor, will be awarded in Stockholm on June 3, 2022.

03.02.2022

What happens to the nutrient cycle when typhoons churn the sea: Insights from the eye of the storm

In September 2018, an expedition as part of the German-Chinese project MEGAPOL was affected by the super typhoon “Mangkhut”. This resulted in the collection of unique data sets on the nutrient budget in the impacted part of the South China Sea. Enormous amounts of nutrients were mixed into the surface water from deeper layers, where they tripled the growth of phytoplankton in a few weeks.

31.01.2022

Looking beneath the surface of the changing oceans: IOW supports successful deployment of new Argo Float sensors

As part of the DArgo2025 project, Germany’s Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency coordinated the successful validation and deployment of new sensors on automated drifting buoys, so-called Argo floats. These sensors can now be deployed worldwide. In this context, the IOW evaluated novel nutrient sensors that were tested in the Baltic Sea. The project, which ended in December 2021, was funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research.

27.01.2022

„Indecent“ witnesses: Using faecal lipids to reconstruct human population growth in the Baltic Sea region

What rivers carry into the Baltic Sea usually ends up in one of its deep basins. Geologists find so-called proxies in these deposits – evidence they use to reconstruct earlier environmental conditions. In a recently published study , Jérôme Kaiser from the IOW and Mathias Lerch from the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research show that population development and wastewater history in the Baltic Sea region can also be reconstructed in this way – with the help of the remains of faeces!

04.01.2022

Confirmed: If sewage sludge is applied to fields, microplastics can get into deeper soil layers and onto adjacent areas

The fact that sewage sludge from municipal waste water treatment plants contains a high proportion of microplastics has already been shown in earlier studies. It was suspected that the use of such sludge for fertilising fields could also promote the uncontrolled input of microplastics into the wider environment. Now, studies conducted as part of the project MicroCatch_Balt funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research confirm this assumption.

16.12.2021

Sea grass is no patent solution for climate change

Regenerating sea grass beds in coastal waters aims at removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to fight climate change. However, tropical sea grass beds can release more carbon dioxide than they absorb. This was shown in a study by an international research team led by biogeochemist Bryce Van Dam from the Helmholtz Centre Hereon, in which also scientists from the IOW participated.