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This page contains latest news regarding the institute. Some entries are only available in German.

 

Home run for the RV Maria S. Merian: Research vessel sets off towards the Baltic Sea ice for the “Deep Baltic” mission

From February 25 to March 23, 2021, a team of physicists and geologists from Warnemünde, Kiel and Szczecin will be underway in the northern Baltic Sea to investigate the dynamics of winterly deep water circulation. Besides recording the current hydrodynamic conditions near and under the sea ice of the Gulf of Bothnia, the program includes sedimentological and geophysical studies to investigate sediment erosion and deposition characteristics induced by deep-water movement. A further aim is to reconstruct the history of deep water circulation in the northern Baltic Sea during Holocene climate variations recorded in older sediments.

» Read more …

 

In search of the “Golden Spike”: On the role of microplastics in defining the Anthropocene

In a recently published discussion paper, Juliana Ivar do Sul and Matthias Labrenz, environmental scientists at the IOW, focus on the topic of microplastics from a geological perspective. They discuss whether the omnipresent plastic particles could be used to identify the beginning of a new, not-yet formalised geological epoch, the Anthropocene, in geo-archives such as sediment cores. Moreover, microplastics could be used at a suitable location to establish the so called Golden Spike, which, by definition, is used in geology to document the beginning of an epoch, period or era.

» Read more …

 

First-time detection of glyphosate in the sea: IOW develops new method and successfully applies it to Baltic Sea samples

Glyphosate is one of the world’s most widely used weed killers. The disputed herbicide, which is suspected to be carcinogenic among other things, gets transported from the on-land application areas into rivers, which wash it into the sea. So far it was unclear, however, how much can be found in marine environments, because glyphosate and its metabolite aminomethylphosphonic acid could not be measured in saltwater due to methodological reasons. Marisa Wirth from the IOW has now developed a new method, with which both substances can reliably be measured in seawater and for the first time was able to detect glyphosate and AMPA in the Baltic Sea.

» Read more …

 

Regional consequences of last glacial climate fluctuations in ultra-high resolution with the help of climate indicators

Using a sediment core from the Black Sea, Warnemünde geologists reconstructed together with an international team how the transition into the Greenland Interstadial 10 (GI10), a climate warming 41,000 years ago, affected the Black Sea region over the course of decades. The in-depth study was made possible by a precise synchronization with the ice cores and high resolution multi-proxy analyses. Since this detailed paleo study covers time scales comparable to those of the recent global warming, it contributes to the understanding of relevant processes.

» Read more …

 

The long arm of the Atlantic: How the climate of Northern Europe is influenced from afar

Climate researchers at the IOW for the first time were able to show with the help of statistical analyses, how fluctuations in the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) affected the meteorological phenomenon of the North Atlantic Oscillation in the course of the last millennium. They also could establish a link between AMO and climate variables in the Baltic Sea region, such as the spread of sea ice, surface water temperature or river inflow.

» Read more …

 

Focus

Microplastics in the Sea

Alarming news about the growing littering of the seas and the omnipresence of microplastics trigger the public concern. Marine scientists are working with special emphasis to answer open questions related to this highly topical environmental issue. At the IOW, we investigate

• whether microplastics might serve as an ideal transportation vehicle for pathogenic germs

• how methods to determine microplastics, which today are still very time-consuming, can be improved

• which are the sources and pathways of microplastics into the sea.

Read more …

Contact persons in all matters of press and public relation at the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research are

 

Dr. Kristin Beck
Tel.: 0381 5197 135
E-Mail: krisnulltin.beck@io-warnemuende.de

 

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch
Tel.: 0381 5197 102
E-Mail: barbnullara.hentzsch@io-warnemuende.de

Satellite image of the month

Satellite image of the month
Mean Sea Surface Temperature of Baltic Sea on 25.03.2019 produced from data of NOAA- and MetOp weather satellites.

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