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This page contains latest news regarding the institute. Some entries are only available in German.

 

Confirmed: If sewage sludge is applied to fields, microplastics can get into deeper soil layers and onto adjacent areas

The fact that sewage sludge from municipal waste water treatment plants contains a high proportion of microplastics has already been shown in earlier studies. It was suspected that the use of such sludge for fertilising fields could also promote the uncontrolled input of microplastics into the wider environment. Now, studies conducted as part of the project MicroCatch_Balt funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research confirm this assumption.

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Sea grass is no patent solution for climate change

Regenerating sea grass beds in coastal waters aims at removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to fight climate change. However, tropical sea grass beds can release more carbon dioxide than they absorb. This was shown in a study by an international research team led by biogeochemist Bryce Van Dam from the Helmholtz Centre Hereon, in which also scientists from the IOW participated.

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A Threat to the Baltic Sea? Long-term development of pollution by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread, highly toxic and often carcinogenic environmental pollutants. Marion Kanwischer from the IOW and her team have studied the long-term development of PAH pollution in the Baltic Sea. Although the overall contamination has eased in recent years, PAHs still pose a toxicological threat to the Baltic Sea. Traffic emissions are a major contributor to the current PAH pollution.

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The German sea shells – New publication presents an extensive documentation of mussels living in German sea areas (and beyond)

Michael L. Zettler, senior scientist at the IOW, has been researching the occurrence and living conditions of the inhabitants of the seabed of the Baltic Sea and other seas – the so-called zoobenthos – for many years. Now he has contributed his profound expertise to a monograph on the marine bivalves of Germany, thus closing, together with co-author Axel Alf, a gap in the renowned series “Die Tierwelt Deutschlands”.

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Major Baltic Inflows can cause just minor and only temporary improvements of the Baltic Sea´s state of eutrophication

With detailed analyses of water and sediment samples from the Gotland Basin, geoscientists from the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research succeeded in tracing the geochemical processes, which followed the Major Baltic Inflow in 2014/2015. Their conclusion: even very large amounts of oxygenated waters cause only small and temporary improvements of the nutrient situation in the central Baltic Sea.

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Focus

Fact sheet on climate change and its impacts in the Baltic Sea region

How does climate change affect the Baltic Sea and what are its possible impacts on the marine environment? The international research network Baltic Earth and the Helsinki Commission for the protection of the Baltic Sea marine environment, HELCOM, published a synopsis of current research results from about 100 researchers from the entire Baltic Sea region in the form of a compact fact sheet (download available here).

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Contact persons in all matters of press and public relation at the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research are

 

Dr. Kristin Beck
Tel.: 0381 5197 135
E-Mail: krisnulltin.beck@io-warnemuende.de

 

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch
Tel.: 0381 5197 102
E-Mail: barbnullara.hentzsch@io-warnemuende.de

Satellite image of the month

Satellite image of the month
Mean Sea Surface Temperature of Baltic Sea on 25.03.2019 produced from data of NOAA- and MetOp weather satellites.

read more in  >> satellite images